:::kbs

Images unique and inspirational, natural and created, sacred and profane. Curated by kimboo york

samanticshift:

all my complaints about the fat acceptance community aside, i do hate the term “skinny-shaming.” what we’re actually talking about is body-shaming experienced by skinny people, but skinny-shaming makes it sound like thin people face body-shaming equal to that of fat people, which obviously isn’t the case. in other words, it shifts the focus from body-shaming in general to one of the least common forms of body-shaming. there’s no excuse for body-shaming anyone, esp not when so many women and girls hate their bodies regardless of size, but i really don’t think the word “skinny-shaming” is necessary.

gdfalksen:

Photographer Michael David Adams captures mystery and raw beauty in ‘Moonstruck,’ featuring Cirque du Soleil’s Amaluna and charmer, Letecia Price. 

(Source: caitlynallysepenke)

blackpaint20:

Memento mori ring, Europe, 1801-1900
‘Memento mori’ translates from Latin as ‘Remember you must die’. This metal memento mori ring is in the form of a large skull and crossbones wedged between two snakes. The skull and crossbones is the traditional symbol of piracy, but also had other meanings. It suggested the ultimate triumph of death over life, for example Shakespeare’s famous scene in which Hamlet holds the skull of Yoric. Such rings were reminders of death. They prompted people about the shortness of life and the inevitability of death. A skull was typically used to represent death from the 1500s onwards. It gradually replaced the common older image of a skeleton leading a living person off to their death

blackpaint20:

Memento mori ring, Europe, 1801-1900

‘Memento mori’ translates from Latin as ‘Remember you must die’. This metal memento mori ring is in the form of a large skull and crossbones wedged between two snakes. The skull and crossbones is the traditional symbol of piracy, but also had other meanings. It suggested the ultimate triumph of death over life, for example Shakespeare’s famous scene in which Hamlet holds the skull of Yoric. Such rings were reminders of death. They prompted people about the shortness of life and the inevitability of death. A skull was typically used to represent death from the 1500s onwards. It gradually replaced the common older image of a skeleton leading a living person off to their death

architectureofdoom:

Postcard: Greetings from East Berlin, Capital of the Architecture of Doom
Submitted by George Hook

architectureofdoom:

Postcard: Greetings from East Berlin, Capital of the Architecture of Doom

Submitted by George Hook

theotherjax:


hideakiohno:

Casual reminder that in one of Leonardo da Vinci’s many notebooks containing innumerable artistic and scientific sketches and notes of incomprehensible importance, there is a sketch of two penises with legs and tails walking towards a crudely drawn anus.
The sketch was most likely done by Leonardo’s apprentice Salai, who was not only very likely one of Leonardo’s lovers, but who was also infamously mischievous. Better yet, the anus is literally labeled “Salai.”
So either Salai drew these while Leonardo wasn’t looking just to annoy his boyfriend, or Leonardo himself put actual time and energy into drawing these. Either way, the human race is truly blessed to have made such a discovery.
There are dick drawings like the ones you see on desks in school in Leonardo da Vinci’s notebooks. Please cherish this information.

In the midst of exploring Renaissance Italy history for reasons, I have found a wonder.

theotherjax:

hideakiohno:

Casual reminder that in one of Leonardo da Vinci’s many notebooks containing innumerable artistic and scientific sketches and notes of incomprehensible importance, there is a sketch of two penises with legs and tails walking towards a crudely drawn anus.

The sketch was most likely done by Leonardo’s apprentice Salai, who was not only very likely one of Leonardo’s lovers, but who was also infamously mischievous. Better yet, the anus is literally labeled “Salai.”

So either Salai drew these while Leonardo wasn’t looking just to annoy his boyfriend, or Leonardo himself put actual time and energy into drawing these. Either way, the human race is truly blessed to have made such a discovery.

There are dick drawings like the ones you see on desks in school in Leonardo da Vinci’s notebooks. Please cherish this information.

In the midst of exploring Renaissance Italy history for reasons, I have found a wonder.

(via flux-capacitard)